EDU270 – Lesson 7: Teens Facing Adult Consequences

As a mother, I feel fairly confident about preparing my teenage son for adulthood.  I consistently warn him of the pitfalls that teens face which land them in adult situations too soon.  I say, “You are 18 now, you can not date girls that are younger than you.”  Another popular one, “No, you can’t drive without a permit or license!”  Of course, I go on to explain why and what the consequences are if he chooses not to listen.  Most importantly, I provide “real world” examples.  Most times, he listens.

After reading and pondering the debate about teens lacking adult reasoning capacity, yet being held to adult consequences, I realize my responsibility to educate my students as I do my son.  There are many ways I can do this; such as incorporating real world scenarios in my lesson planning which leads to having candid discussions when there is an opportunity.  

Recently, a group of girls were planning to “jump” one of their classmates after school because of gossip and misinformation.  I decided to get them together and facilitate a ‘sitdown’ meeting.  I believe it was successful because of the level of awareness I brought to the table.  We discussed their intended actions as well as the potential consequences.  Given time to process it, they decided to work it out.  Today, they are all friends and doing well.  They continue to meet with me because they appreciate the opportunity to have an outlet. 

It is researched and scientifically proven that the teen brain is not mature enough to help control impulses or respond rationally; which means they often make snap decisions or judgements and act on them to their own detriment.  Parents, teachers, and other community members exposed to these teens are obligated to pay attention, be available if needed and continuously educate them about potential pitfalls.  


Photo Credit:  Marcos Gomes

EDU270 – Lesson 5: Language and Reading

If I knew then, what I know now…My son’s academic standing could have been vastly different.  I am certain of it!

The good news is that I have years ahead of me to make a difference with hundreds more students who will cross my path.

There is no way for me to go back to early childhood and “redo” anything for my son or my students in the classroom.  The only thing I can do is be aware of scientifically-based research that supports methods to improve the language and reading skills of my son and students.

I am particularly concerned at this point with my student’s growth in ability to read and communicate.

I know that before the age of 3 years old, my students needed to hear the language spoken to them frequently (even as early as in the womb).  They needed a lot of words spoken to them, even complex sentences that they may not have understood then, but would definitely understand later on in life.  I also know that they needed adults to expose them to pre-reading skills – such as, picture (flash) cards, ability to group by sound, and sound for meaning.  Playing word games, singing nursery rhymes, reading books with children, asking them to read aloud, and monitoring their overall progress is essential to them doing better later academically and exhibiting a higher IQ.

So that was in the past.  I am tasked with meeting my students in the present and helping them into a better future.

That means, in my classroom, I lead and encourage my students to:

  • Read as many books as possible (at home and during school hours)
  • Share aloud what they have read
  • Expose themselves to longer more complex sentences
  • Make connections between what they see and what they say (letter – sound)
  • Play word games
  • Use poetry and song lyrics to make connections

 

Because the brain is always reshaping based on what the students are exposed to, it is essential to continue to create enriching opportunities that will only enhance their knowledge and keep them sharp as they grow and mature into adulthood.

 

EDU270 – Lesson 3: Attention, Emotions, & Learning

“Please pay attention…get on task…focus!  Do you hear me?”

As a mother of a teenager who struggled with attention deficit disorder (a label he hates even now), I thought I had the best information and tools in my arsenal.  I read many of the books and even became certified to coach parents of attention deficit disorder or hyperactive disorder ADD/ADHD children.

What I did not realize is the real root cause of inattentiveness; nor how to positively impact my son’s environment enough to support him in developing attention skills.  I also needed to view some of his behaviors as normal because his brain was doing something that would prove invaluable later on in his life.

The parent coaching certification program I completed never addressed infant or child brain development or research – it was simply so long ago.  Back then, the focus was on mainly behavior outcomes and educational reform advocacy.

Today, I know so much more!  Some of the behaviors infants and toddlers display is actually necessary for orientating, maintaining, and controlling or regulating their attention skills.  Patience and understanding is what is needed during the so-called terrible twos.  Although it looks like an unnecessary tantrum, the brain is busy at work in reconstructing that child’s neural patterns.  This is when the child is developing their patience, controlling emotions, and directing their focus.

As a middle school teacher with this understanding, I am grateful for the opportunity to positively impact my student’s environment by:

  • providing opportunities to make the best of their attention skills with curriculum and activities that consider their specific needs
  • passing on my knowledge and encouraging parents to reinforce healthier nutrition and  regular bedtimes (proper sleep is vital to brain cell development)
  • providing a safe environment in my classroom – free of the big 5 (fear, hunger, abuse, neglect, or depression)
This mean social/emotional learning is taking place in addition to academics.  In my opinion, this is the real ‘no child left behind’ initiative – because they all matter.  Not an easy undertaking but a necessary one.  I am responsible for teaching in a manner that raises the bar for them socially, emotionally, and intellectually.
As for my son who is now 18 years old, it isn’t too late to positively impact his growth and development.  All it takes is to continue to provide a structured nurturing environment, and encourage consistent open communication.  So far, it’s going well.

Photo Credit:  Quinn Dombrowski

EDU270 – Lesson 2: Vision and Hearing

Identifying vision and hearing problems as early as possible is one of the main objectives when it comes to our youth.  When a child has difficulty hearing or seeing it can have lifelong implications if not dealt with soon as possible (at the earliest age).

As a parent I was always concerned with my son not hearing or seeing something inappropriate.  It never occurred to me that he could have genetic issues or problems resulting from the environment he was in.  For instance, he has been an avid video gamer his whole young life.  Until this lesson, I did not realize that constant, loud and repetitive sounds were not good for his hearing.  So that race car going around and around the track making a lot of noise was not a good way for him to spend his time as a preschool or elementary school student.  It may have impacted him academically.

After viewing videos on both vision and hearing on the Changing Brains: Effects of Experience on Human Bran Development website, I have a new found respect for our fragile youth.

“In the first few years of life, hearing is a critical part of kids’ social, emotional, and cognitive development. Even a mild or partial hearing loss can affect a child’s ability to speak and understand language (kidshealth.org).”  hearing-99016_960_720

As a teacher I am not just concerned with one student, but I must observe all of them for any hint of hearing or vision defects.  Although by the time they reach middle school there should have been early detection, the truth is our youth remain fragile for many years.  Especially those in under-served/impoverished  communities.  They remain at-risk due to environmental issues such as poor nutrition, exposure to alcohol and drugs, and often a lack of routine pediatric visits.  The school nurse becomes the primary medical source for those kids.

“Children should be examined by an eye doctor during infancy, preschool, and school years to detect potential vision defects. Did you know that a child can pass the 20/20 test and still have significant vision problems which will interfere in school, sports and/or social life (children-special-needs.org)?” index

The ears and eyes are connected to the command center (a.k.a. BRAIN).  Early detection and remedy of any issues concerning sight and sound could make the difference in the life of a young person who aspires to be a healthy, happy adult one day.

 

References:
http://kidshealth.org/en/parents/hear.html
http://www.children-special-needs.org/parent.html

 

EDU270 -Lesson 1: Brain Architecture, Plasticity, and the Impact of Environment on a Child

After watching the videos: Brain Plasticity and Imaging/Development on the website: Changing Brains: Effects of Experience on Human Brain Development, I realized there is a lot more to teaching than standing in the front of the room and sharing lesson plans.  How am I impacted by this information as a teacher?

Our youth are fragile human beings that require a lot more than most realize.  Specifically, they require individualized attention in a collective world.  Because the child’s brain is continually developing and as a teacher I have a great deal to do with the sensitive periods during that development, I must be both deliberate and considerate in my teaching method.

I want to see each of my students grow and mature to a healthy adult life and way of being.  My greatest contribution as a teacher can only take place during the minutes I have them in my classroom.  For me, those moments are precious.  The deliberate actions taken must be positive and reinforce building a healthy brain.  The activities we do in the classroom, the conversations we hold, and what I expose them to all play an important role in building a strong foundation for their future growth and development.

 

A plan to keep up…

Rio-logo-reflectLast semester I cut it a bit close when it comes to delivering on my coursework.  I procrastinated and paid dearly for it in the end.  Sure, I can come up with many reasons why it happened, but none of those reasons matter in the end.  Just – get it done!

This is my 1st of the two remaining semesters and I will be finished!  Yay!!!

My goal is to stay on task and deliver assignments on time this semester.  Today is day one.  I have four different courses to maintain and a tremendous amount of work to complete to satisfy all the requirements of each.

I am blogging about this experience to hold myself accountable.  Even if no one else reads this – I will have to comply.

My courses are:

  • POS221 – Arizona Constitution
  • EDU256AE – Intern Certificate Student Teaching Lab – Secondary Education III
  • EDU270AB – Secondary Reading and Decoding Methods
  • EDU270 – Learning and the Brain

My plan is to read each syllabus tonight and review all of the assignments.  I will then calendar due dates and read text for this first week.  I am still waiting for a few textbooks.  This is going to be great!